Friday, March 12, 2010

Al Ain National Museum #2 (Sultan Fort)

Continuing yesterday's post about the Sultan Fort in Al Ain National Museum...

After the quick chit chat with the emarati women inside the tents, I went to the Sultan Fort, just few steps away from the tents. Sultan Fort or The Eastern Fort was built by late Sheikh Sultan Bin Zayed The First (father of Sheikh Zayed, the President) in 1910 AD. It is a square-shaped fort with three round towers, four rooms, and a well in the courtyard (as seen in the replica that I saw inside the museum). Sun-dried mudbricks and clay were the construction materials used in building the fort. In 1969, the fort was restored by the Department of Antiquities and Tourism, and one of the towers was rebuilt in 1991. Nowadays it is being managed and maintained by the Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage. I noticed that it is very simple compared to the majestic Al Ain Palace Museum. By the way, it was closed during my visit. I wasn't able to take some pictures of the interior.







In the past, the holes on the upper part of the walls and towers were used to defend the fort.
The inscriptions on the wooden panel in the main entrance (door) depicted the date of its construction. You can click the images to enlarge.

Yours truly, having some fun...click! click!..thanks hubby.


the replica of the fort that I saw inside the museum

Sultan Fort is open in the mornings only, from Saturdays to Thursdays and closed in the afternoons, on Fridays and on public holidays.

That's all for the Sultan Fort. Next will be the two sections of Al Ain National Museum. More photos tomorrow and the day after tomorrow. Oh! let me thank some of the staff for answering my questions especially after seeing the Al Nahyan Family Tree (looks better than the one that I saw in Al Ain Palace Museum). My hearttfelt thanks to you guys.

Word of the day: bab is the arabic word for the door. Salaam to all!

8 comments:

  1. Hi, I just stumbled upon your blog. I'm sure glad I did so.
    Very interesting and I like you photos also. If you don't mind, I'm going to tag along.

    It's so nice to get a real peek into other cultures! great job

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  2. It is a dreamlike landmark architecture.

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  3. Great architecture -- much plainer than so many of the palaces and forts! Interesting history to go with your great photos, Misalyn! Another very informative post and beautiful captures! Hope you have a wonderful weekend!

    Sylvia

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  4. Love those fortress! The architecture is extraordinary!

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  5. wow, the fortress looks majestic and well guarded, you hardly see any windows in it.
    i love how you captured the birds perch outside the area.
    they seem to b plenty of them.

    you're in the province already?! since when? ^0^
    i'm sure it's a memorable reunion with your family and relatives, considering you've been gone for quite awhile, i'm glad you stil get to blog despite your busy day. ^0^ you have a lot of catching up to do.
    have you eaten the foods you've been craving yet?! ^0^ haha,
    happy weekend missy!

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  6. Love it.
    Aloha from Hawaii my Friend Miss!


    Comfort Spiral

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  7. What an interesting structure, I am glad to hear it is being maintained and preserved. Great photos, you captured a lot of detail.

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Marhaba! SHUKRAN JAZILAN for taking time to reading my posts and posting your comments.

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